Monday, February 22, 2021

How does one become a reader? by Dru Ann Love

It starts when someone, most likely mom, reads to you

Then you are read from picture books, pretty pictures with words

Then you begin to understand the words

Then you realize different words make sentences

Now you know what happens on each page, sort of like you are reading even if you don’t know the words

You are older, and can point out the book that you want read to you

You know a few of the words by sight as they go along with the story

What is that on the table, a box of cereal

Lots of words but the picture tells what you are eating

And you know the words when you see them

Ahh, time for school where you will learn your A-B-Cs

Now you know what those words are in the book and on the cereal box

Look ma, I’m reading!

You are now a reader and let the fun begin.


What do you remember about your early reading days?



23 comments:

  1. You've conjured up sweet memories, Dru Ann. What I remember most vividly is the quiet adventure of going to the library every week to choose a new read.

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  2. Both of my parents read to me as a kid. And I was among those reading to my younger brother. (He is seven years younger than me.) And my niece and nephew when I'd visit.

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  3. I love this, Dru Ann. I'm watching my kids grow into readers doing all the things you mentioned. It's a joy to watch!

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  4. I was an early reader and lover of books. In addition to checking out piles of books from the library, I earned the reading badge in Girl Scouts. That required reading over 100 books, most of them prescribed. As an English teacher, I've taught over 100 titles. I've been in Goodreads practically all of my life! Thanks for giving me this opportunity to remember my reading history, Dru Ann.

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  5. I have a great niece who is learning to read. It's a joy watching her, and experience her sense of accomplishment vicariously. Being four years old, was so long ago, I can't remember what learning to read was like.

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    1. I love when they try to sound out a word and there you are helping with a big smile on your face

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  6. This subject is near and dear to me, Dru. Though too young to remember the details, I believe that the intimate physicality of sitting in the lap of someone who loved me, listening as they read, led to the comfort I felt when I was old enough to read on my own. While Dr. Seuss and others entertained me then, the shelves full of grown up books piqued my curiosity. My fondest memory is when I noticed Shakespeare's plays on a shelf I could reach. I opened one of the volumes and found Romeo and Juliet. Not long after, I was the precocious eight-year-old prancing around the house reciting Juliet's balcony speech over and over and over again. Drove my folks nuts.

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    1. Dru ~ I enjoyed your posting and, Gay, I enjoyed your comment in response to it. I used to memorize poems and I'd beg people to listen.

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    2. I guess both of us were a couple of hams, Kathryn!

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  7. This is why I teach. To bring knowledge and open the world of reading to my students. So rewarding.

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  8. Being born to someone who values reading or having someone close to you that values reading is the luckiest of situations. My mother who had taught third grad for 20 years before I was born gave to me the gift of loving to read, and I passed it on to my children, and my daughter has passed it on to hers. A chain of reading love.

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  9. I started very early asking what the letters were and I was reading at 4 and haven't stopped!

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    1. I remember being happy to know my letters

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  10. I have always always loved books but I wasn't a Bluebird Reader in 3rd grade. For some reason, it took me a bit longer to catch on about reading for myself, but when I did, so many worlds opened to this very small town gal.

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  11. Reading has been the greatest joy of my life, a journey I take whenever I enter a book. I think the modeling I saw - parents who were both readers - made all the difference.

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  12. Love this, Dru. Reading is the ultimate for communication and bonding. There is nothing like cuddling between your children and reading bedtime story. Now it's on to my grandchildren. I love when they attempt to read using the same expression I use in my voice. Such a simple gift we can give to our kids and future generations.

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